7 bad password habits you need to break

Passwords

7 bad password habits you need to break

1. Using the same password everywhere.

Analysts estimate that some 50% of people on the Internet are still using the same password for all of their logins. This is one of the riskiest things you can do online. With massive breaches affecting more consumer websites and services, it’s only a matter of time before one (if not more) of your online accounts gets leaked online.

2. Not having a password system.

Are you forever hitting the “forgot password” link? Especially with websites you use once a year, like TurboTax, and then forget about it the rest of the year? Without a system, it’s impossible to remember where you have accounts, how many you have on each website, and which username and password you registered with. Without a system, you’re wasting time and interrupting your workflow.

3. Never updating passwords.

When was the last time you updated the password for your email accounts? How about your online banking and other financial accounts?

4. Checking the “remember me” option.

Many websites give you the option to remember your username and password. They might also keep you logged in to the website for as long as possible. The danger here is that 1) You’ll likely forget the username and password if you have the website remember it without securely storing it elsewhere, and 2) Anyone with direct access to your computer will have no trouble getting to your accounts.

5. Storing passwords in the browser.

Storing passwords in your browser might be convenient, but it’s not enough to keep your passwords and online accounts protected.

6. Sharing passwords too liberally.

At some point, you’ve probably had to share a password. It could be a WiFi login with your house guests, or accounts to pay online bills with your spouse, or a login with your business partner. Whatever the case, passwords should be shared sparingly, and only with those you trust. And when the person no longer needs the password, it should be updated immediately.

7. Emailing passwords.

In the same way, you should be careful about who you share the passwords with, you should also be careful about how you share those passwords. Email is unsafe and should never be used to send sensitive data, especially passwords.

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.